Human and Technologies in Outer Space – Dr. Katarina Damjanov

Abstract

Outer space has a special place in considerations of human-computer interactions. After all, they are the main means by which we access its inhuman expanses. The progress of space exploration configures our relations with technologies, propelling them into myriad alien environments. In this talk, I consider outer space as a promising arena of multidisciplinary inquiry into human-computer exchanges, highlighting the ways in which its inhuman setting conditions their unfolding on and off the planet.

Dr. Katarina Damjanov

Short Bio

Katarina is lecturer in digital media and communication design at the University of Western Australia. Her research revolves around considerations of the changing relationships between humans, technologies and environments in the space age. Some of her work features in journals such as Science, Technology & Human Values, Environment and Planning D: Society and Space, Leonardo, Mobilities and Fibreculture. rer in digital media and communication design at the University of Western Australia. Her research revolves around considerations of the changing relationships between humans, technologies and environments in the space age. Some of her work features in journals such as Science, Technology & Human Values, Environment and Planning D: Society and Space, Leonardo, Mobilities and Fibreculture.

More about Katarina on: http://www.web.uwa.edu.au/person/katarina.damjanov


Who Am I ? How Visual Media Shapes Our Sense of Self – Prof. Damian Schofield

Abstract

An intrinsic connection exists between humans and the memories they create; they define who we are, where we came from and our accomplishments and failures. However, decades of research has shown how fragile human memory can be. Almost all interactions with modern technology rely on vision as the primary means of passing information to the user. Memories, personalities, behaviours are all shaped by this swarm of visual media in which we work, play and constantly exist. There is a need to reconsider the assumptions that underlie the use of these visuals based on our ever improving understanding of human psychology, cognition and perception. This presentation will introduce research undertaken by the speaker over the past twenty years that has experimented with, and examined a range of visually based presentation technology – in particular in courtroom and educational environments.

Prof. Dr. Damian Schofield

Short Bio

Dr. Schofield is currently Director of Human Computer Interaction at the State University of New York, a position he has held since 2009. Prior to his move to America, Dr. Schofield held the position of the Associate Professor of Computer Games and Digital Media, in the School of Creative Media at RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia. Before his move out to Australia, he was Lecturer in the School of Computer Science at the University of Nottingham, in the UK. Dr. Schofield also remains a director and major shareholder of Aims Solutions Ltd., a UK based company, providing computer graphics visualization services and virtual reality based simulation training products to a wide range of public and private sector organizations.

Dr. Schofield has been involved in research examining the use of digital imagery in courtrooms and classrooms, particularly computer games/graphics technology, for over 20 years. He is specifically interested in the representation and understanding of visual information. Dr. Schofield has worked on major research projects all over the world – he has also acted as a consultant for the FBI, and appeared on multiple television shows as a scientific expert.

More about Damian on: http://www.cs.oswego.edu/~schofield/