Human and Technologies in Outer Space – Dr. Katarina Damjanov

Dr. Katarina Damjanov

Outer space has a special place in considerations of human-computer interactions. After all, they are the main means by which we access its inhuman expanses. The progress of space exploration configures our relations with technologies, propelling them into myriad alien environments. In this talk, I consider outer space as a promising arena of multidisciplinary inquiry into human-computer exchanges, highlighting the ways in which its inhuman setting conditions their unfolding on and off the planet.

Short Bio

Katarina is lecturer in digital media and communication design at the University of Western Australia. Her research revolves around considerations of the changing relationships between humans, technologies and environments in the space age. Some of her work features in journals such as Science, Technology & Human Values, Environment and Planning D: Society and Space, Leonardo, Mobilities and Fibreculture. rer in digital media and communication design at the University of Western Australia. Her research revolves around considerations of the changing relationships between humans, technologies and environments in the space age. Some of her work features in journals such as Science, Technology & Human Values, Environment and Planning D: Society and Space, Leonardo, Mobilities and Fibreculture.

More about Katarina on: http://www.web.uwa.edu.au/person/katarina.damjanov

Title to be announced – Prof. Damian Schofield

Abstract

to be announced soon

Short Bio

Prof. Dr. Damian Schofield

Damian is director of Human Computer Interaction (Full Professor) at State University of New York (Oswego); U.S.A. Visiting Associate Professor of Digital Forensics, Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia; and Director of Aims Solutions Ltd. (VR Simulation Company), Nottingham, England. His research work centres around human issues as e.g. in research examining the use of digital evidence in courtrooms, particularly virtual reconstructions (using computer games, graphics and virtual reality technology).

I am specifically interested in the representation and understanding of visual evidentiary information in the courtroom environment. Much of this academic research in the forensic area has concentrated on the investigation of the prejudicial effect of digital evidence, validation and verification procedures, admissibility of digital evidence and the mathematical uncertainty concerned with digital evidence. I have been recognised internationally as a leading academic in this field, and have been used as an expert witness in courts all over the world.

More about Damian on: http://www.cs.oswego.edu/~schofield/